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Daughter of Regals & Other Tales

Daughter of Regals & Other Tales
by Stephen R. Donaldson
Published by Ballantine Books, 1984
Amazon.com: hardcover, paperback
Amazon.ca: hardcover, paperback
Amazon.co.uk: hardcover, paperback
Recommended by: Greg Slade
[Daughter of Regals]

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Donaldon is probably best known for his Chronicles of Thomas Covenant, the Unbeliever, and, indeed, this collection includes what Donaldson as an "out-take" from The Illearth War, the second volume of that trilogy. However, as this volume illustrates, Donald is capable of dealing with multiple genres, not just "fat fantasies."

The title story, "The Lady in White", and "Ser Visal's Tale" are all traditional fantasies, although in different worlds from the Thomas Covenant books. "Gilden-Fire" is the aforementioned "out-take." "Mythological Beast" brings fantasy elements into a science fiction setting. "Animal Lover" is a straight science fiction story. You might classify "Unworthy of the Angel" as an urban fantasy. "The Conqueror Worm" doesn't, strictly speaking, have any fantasy or science fiction elements, but has the same disturbing atmosphere as some episodes of The Twilight Zone.

"Unworthy of the Angel" is of particular interest because, like the Thomas Covenant books, it deals with the question of how a loving, omnipotent God can allow pain and evil in the world. (And, also like the Thomas Covenant books, seems to come to the conclusion that God is not, in fact, omnipotent, but rather has constraints on His power.) "Ser Visal's Tale" is set in a world dominated by a legalistic religion run by self-serving "Templemen." (November, 2006)


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