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The Place of the Lion

[The Place of the Lion] The Place of the Lion
by Charles Williams
Published by Pellegrini & Cudahy, 1933
Amazon.co.uk: paperback
Amazon.ca: paperback, audiobook
Amazon.com: paperback, audiobook
Recommended by: Ross Pavlac

Note that Charles Williams' novels are not in a series, and may be read in any order. His writing style is dark and complex, and heavily laden with atmosphere and symbolism; thus, his books are not to everyone's taste. A good "first" book to try would be either The Place of the Lion or All Hallows' Eve.

Other Comments:

A lioness escapes from a travelling wild beast show. A man who leads a monthly discussion group inquiring into the deeper meaning of life suddenly goes into a coma. A reclusive scholar is invited to take his place and chooses to speak on the history of philosophy. A butterfly collector encounters the most perfect and beautiful butterfly in the world. Of such things, in the worlds of Charles Williams, come the rifts between what we call the real world and the hidden world which underlies and sustains it. Unlike Williams' earlier books, this one does not involve a battle between good and evil, but rather an outbreak of angelic power upon a world which is not capable of dealing with them. Once again, the day is saved, although not with any explicit reference to Christ. Symbolic, sure. The story is practically dripping with symbolism, and who are not up on the history of theology may well find it all rather confusing. Come to think of it, even those who are up on the history of theology are likely to find it fairly hard to follow. I have to disagree with Ross' assessment: War in Heaven and Many Dimensions are unusual, sure, but I found them more accessible than this book. — Greg Slade (March, 2004)

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