[Home][Creativity][Genres][Resources][Links][About Us]

[Audio][Biographies][Books][Events][Film][Interviews][Mailing List][Publications][Publications]

[Shared Reading List][Award Winning Books List][CBA Fiction Reading List][Magazines][Ross Pavlac's Christian SF and Fantasy Reading List][Recommended Reading List][Reference List]


[About Amazon.ca] [About Amazon.com] [About Amazon.co.uk] [About ChristianBook.com]
In association with Amazon.ca. In association with Amazon.com. In association with Amazon.co.uk. An affiliate of ChristianBook.com.

The Christian World of C.S. Lewis

[The Christian World of C.S. Lewis] The Christian World of C.S. Lewis
by Clyde S. Kilby
Published by William B. Eerdmans,1964
Amazon.com: paperback
Amazon.ca: paperback
Amazon.co.uk: paperback
Christianbook.com: paperback
Suggested by: Ross Pavlac

The late Clyde Kilby was the single greatest authority in the world on C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, and the Inklings. He began the task of gathering the papers of these people for study at a time when no one else cared, and the Wade Center at Wheaton College is his legacy. Brilliant, brilliant man.

Other Comments:

There are any number of books about C.S. Lewis and his writings, but this is certainly the earliest which I have read so far. In fact, it was originally published the year after Lewis' death, and the persistent use of the present tense to refer to Lewis suggests that the work was substantially complete by the time of his death, and that the references to his passing were worked in after the fact.

Kilby, who taught English at Wheaton College, begins with a brief biographical survey, and then discusses Lewis' works, not in chronological order, but grouped according to broad themes. Thus, in between his discussion of Perelandra and That Hideous Strength, Kilby discusses The Abolition of Man, which is very similar in subject matter to That Hideous Strength (although, of course, not fictional.)

After the discussion of Lewis' books, Kilby then includes a chapter discussing themes which are pervasive in Lewis' works, but which he had not used as the framework of the earlier chapters.

Believe it or not, even though this work was first published the year after Lewis' death, it is not the earliest discussion of Lewis' work in print. Kilby includes a survey of both unpublished doctoral dissertations and published book on Lewis and his work, as the literature existed at the time of the publication of this work. Any such discussion would have to be considerably more extensive today, of course, but it is interesting to note that there were published works discussing Lewis' writings as early as 1949, even before the publication of The Chronicles of Narnia.

There have been many books written on Lewis since his death, some of which are far larger and more complete and than this one. (And, perhaps inevitably, different biographies differ somewhat on the details of Lewis' life.) However, I find it interesting that, even with all the other works on Lewis that I have read, Kilby still told me some things which I had not read anywhere else. – Greg Slade (July, 2005)


[Home][Creativity][Genres][Resources][Links][About Us]

[Audio][Biographies][Books][Events][Film][Interviews][Mailing List][Publications][Publications]

[Shared Reading List][Award Winning Books List][CBA Fiction Reading List][Magazines][Ross Pavlac's Christian SF and Fantasy Reading List][Recommended Reading List][Reference List]

[Home] [Creativity] [Genres] [Resources] [Links] [About Us]

[Audio] [Biographies] [Books] [Events] [Film] [Interviews] [Mailing List] [Publications] [Store]

[Shared Reading List] [Award Winning Books List] [CBA Fiction Reading List] [Magazines] [Ross Pavlac's Christian SF and Fantasy Reading List] [Recommended Reading List] [Reference List]