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Winterflight

Winterflight
by Joseph Bayly
Published by Word Books, 1981
(Reissued by Multnomah, 1995, David C. Cook, 2000, and River Oak, 2006)
Amazon.com: hardcover, paperback
Amazon.ca: paperback
Amazon.co.uk: paperback
ChristianBook.com: paperback
Suggested by: Ross Pavlac
[Winterflight]

Book Rating
Rated 3 (Highly Recommended) by: 2 people
Rated 2 (Recommended) by: 1 people
Rated 1 (Suggested) by: 1 person
Rated 0 (Reviewed) by: 1 person
Total Votes: 5 people
Average Rating: 1.80 (Recommended)
Score: 0.80 (Suggested)

Dystopian novel of the near future when euthanasia is imposed by the government.

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Other Comments:

This book has been on my "to be read" list for years: ever since I first read Ross Pavlac's Christian SF and Fantasy Reading List. I finally got my hands on a copy this year, and it's not at all what I expected. On the basis of the title, and the plot synopses I had read, I was expecting the kind of story you find in lower quality "end times" thrillers: first, the protagonists come to realise that the government is evil (because it's been taken over by the antichrist) and all-knowing (because it uses 1984-style surveillance technology), then, the protagonists decide to escape, and somehow manage to do so, even though the government should know every move they make before they do. It's an old plot, it was unsatisfying the first time, but it keeps being ripped off. In short, I read this book in order to review it for this site, not because I thought it was going to be any good.

Well, I was wrong, and I'm big enough to admit it. Yes, Bayly does introduce surveillance technology, and plays with it for a little bit, and yes, he does have people checking their clothes for tiny bugging devices, and yet still making telephone calls without taking any precautions at all. But pretty soon, he stops playing around with gizmos and gets down to the heart of the story. And the heart of the story is what both makes and breaks this book.

This is a wonderful book which makes me profoundly uncomfortable. Bayly refuses to play any of the games which so many authors resort to in order to please the clientele in Christian bookstores. Nobody gets converted, nobody falls in love, and there is no happy ending. Nor are Christians (not even "the right kind of Christians") portrayed as fearless, flawless, jut-jawed heroes, nor even heroes in their secret identities. In short, almost nobody comes out looking good in this book: Christians display cowardice, rationalise evil things perpetrated by society (as long as those evil things don't apply to them), falsely accuse others, swear... in short, they're human. If the mirror Bayly holds up to the reader is unflattering, at least it's accurate. I have been saying for some time that what Christian fiction needs is fewer books which aim to "evangelise" non-Christians who would never be caught dead reading them, and more books which challenge Christians to do better in our Christian walk. This is one of the few books I have ever found which would qualify as the latter.

Unfortunately, the very qualities which make this book such a refreshing change, and so important for Christians to read, also make it uncomfortable. Some readers can't handle it, and criticise the book over nit-picky details, to avoid facing up to the central challenge in the story. I could pick nits, too, but the fact of the matter is that the weaknesses in this book are trivial, while its theme is vital. In the past, I have criticised Christian publishers for not having enough commitment to publishing fiction outside the romance category, but four different publishers have seen the value in this work, and yet sales have driven it out of print three times now. It's time for us fans to face up to the fact that the publishers have been taking the risk, and now it's our turn to show that we're ready for Christian fiction to grow up. – Greg Slade (June, 2008)

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I've read the book. It is very interesting and creepy. It's the sort of near future dystopia that would make Orwell proud. The "thanotels" may have seemed more likely then than now, but they still have the possibility of becoming a reality. – Adam Walker (June, 2008)

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I was quite impressed when I read it, too, partly because it was so unexpected. It was the first Christian "science fiction" that actually felt like science fiction to me. I'm having trouble articulating what I mean by that. Maybe simply that it didn't offer easy answers and a happy ending. Not that I require all my SF to be dystopian, it's just that Winterflight struck me as a much more thoughtful book than what little other Christian SF I'd read at the time – or that I've read now, for that matter. – Sarah Edwards (June, 2008)

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