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The Shiloh Project

The Shiloh Project
by David R. Beaucage
Published by Virgil W. Hensley, Inc., 1993
Amazon.com: paperback
Amazon.ca: paperback
Amazon.co.uk: paperback
Recommended by: William Barrese
[The Shiloh Project]

Book Rating
Rated 3 (Highly Recommended) by: nobody
Rated 2 (Recommended) by: 2 people
Rated 1 (Suggested) by: 1 person
Rated 0 (Reviewed) by: nobody
Total Votes: 3 people
Average Rating: 1.67 (Recommended)
Score: 0.50 (Suggested)

A science fiction novel of adventure, comedy & romance.

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Other Comments:

Beaucage has a doctorate in mathematics, so it should come as no surprise that his protagonist is a mathematician. (If that's not enough of a warning, this book is the first in a projected series called "Mathematicians in Love.") The premise is that knowledge of a particular mathematical construct allows one to travel backwards and forwards in time. Thus, two mathematicians, sceptic Mel Schwartz and nominal Christian Ruth Foster (and their fellow travellers) meet Daniel, Herod, the wise men from the East, and, of course, the Holy Family. They also witness the destruction of Herod's temple. They also meet God, and leave the plot begging for a sequel, on which Beaucage is working. – Greg Slade (January, 2000)

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I read this yesterday. After the prologue and chapter zero, I was hooked and ended up finishing it in one day. It seems to be first in the series of Mathematicians in Love. I hope to read more when/if they become available. This is clearly a Christian novel; it addresses important issues concerning salvation and prophecy. It gets well into Biblical history. Is it deep into libertarianism? There is a mild (perhaps, Romans 13) respect for the law, but it is clearly broken as deemed appropriate. Folks migrate partially based on avoiding all taxes. There seems to be a cosmopolitan disregard for which country or ruler one is under; one combats evil as it comes. The state seems to be an annoying, but sometimes useful, part of God's creation. There seems to be little distinction between bad guys of the state and other bad guys. When the notion of taxes comes up, one character says, "I hate it when that happens." No doubt there were more libertarian aspects or ideas that I missed. If Dave does have strong libertarian feelings, I don't think he wanted them to get in the way of a Christian message. I love the math, the time-travel adventure, the history, the treatment of BC folks as intelligent, the science, the language, the character of the characters. I did hope for more Greek and Hebrew. The book did leave open (...but left important clues about...) the great philosophical and cientific question that has perhaps bothered all modern thinkers: "Where does the asymmetry of a lead-acid car battery come from?" – Dar Scot (Christlib Host)

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See reviews, comments, & samples on the author's web site: http://www.shilohproject.com

David took part in an online interview in January, 2000.

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